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437 New London Road Newark, DE 19711
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Why I Won't Neuter My Pet

1. I have a purebred, AKC registered dog.

BUT: what do those papers tell you? Your dog's father was Dakota Sunrise, but did Dakota have heart problems, hip dysplasia, or seizures? Did his mother Ark's Kelly Lane have congenital cataracts, Von Willebrand's Disease or glaucoma? These can all be inherited problems that can be passed to your litters.

2. My pet will get fat and lazy.

Fat is caused by too many calories and too little exercise. A 25 pound active dog needs about 600 kcal a day, an active50 pound dog about 1100 kcal. If any dog eats more than the calories needed and exercises too little, fat will find him. Let's see, a mouthful of steak (90 kcal) and a little piece of toast and butter (another 50 kcal). You are already at ¼ of your dog's needed calories, and not very healthily. Fat is palatable – many pet foods are high in fat so that your pet will be sure to eat it.

Neutering (and spaying) may diminish your pet's tendency to fight or wander for territory and a partner, which certainly would burn calories, but could cost your pet its life. Buy a ball and a leash, catnip and a teaser (like a cat wand) – burns calories faster and is far more fun.

3. I want another pet just like Smokey.

Are you just like your brother or mother? Most planned breedings produce fraternal twins – you know, those twins that are born at the same time but don't look or act alike. Even Dolly, the cloned sheep, will act differently from her clone due to her environment.

4. My Jelly Bean is such a great cat. His personality will change if I neuter him.

That implies his personality is driven by his hormones – not true. Urine spraying, fighting, roaming, 'humping' – these are sex related behaviors. Loving their human companion is pure love.

5. We can sell the litter and make a lot of money.

Have you considered the costs of keeping that pregnant pet and her young healthy? What if things don't go well, and you need to rush her in for an emergency visit in the middle of the night? What if she needs a C-section? That might cost $500 (or more) for the surgery alone. What is eclampsia? Could be life threatening. Are you planning to have the tails and dewclaws done? She'll need a good quality food, and will be eating more of it. Those little mouths will be hungry too, once they are weaned. Have to get them started on their first series of vaccines and worming before you sell them. They sure can get dirty and stinky too (don't quite understand the notion of housebreaking). You might just break even.

While breeding may seem as simple as introducing two pets, do your research. Breeding should only be done to improve the breed.

6. My children should see our pet giving birth.

Why? What does that teach them, that they can't learn from books, educational TV, or videos? Mr. Scott Vogel, the SPCA education director, has some excellent videos that would teach the little folks more. The presence of people when an animal is preparing to give birth can be stressful to the pet, so much so that she may not care for the newborn or even injure it or the person or child present. The young are precious. Do we want to teach them at a certain age we just give them away? Take them to an animal shelter. They will see.

7. I am worried about the anesthesia.

The anesthetics used are quite safe. Preoperative blood work can be performed to assess your pet's health and ability to handle drugs.

8. I am worried about the surgery.

Neutering and spaying are the most common of the routine surgeries. Although every pet is special and sometimes bring a little something different to the surgery, the pets do well and seem their old selves again within a day or two. (Actually, sometimes they feel too good.)

9. My Punkin will be a better pet if she is allowed to have a litter.

Nope. She will usually mother her young, but some first moms are too nervous or don't know what they are doing. She may be more agitated around children, strangers, and other pets. She will not look upon you as her litter. It will not 'calm her down'. Age and training do that.

10. My spouse won't let me do it.

Come on now guys. Neutering your pet has nothing to do with a man's anatomy. Only the pet's testicles are removed. The animal suffers no psychological damage, Why wouldn't you want to decrease your pet's incidence of prostatic disease, testicular tumors, perianal tumors, and perianal hernias?

Spaying reduces incidence of mammary tumors (50% of which are malignant in dogs, 90% are malignant in cats), uterine infections and ovarian tumors.

11. It is too expensive.

What does a dinner for four at a fine restaurant cost? How much did you spend on that PlayStation? You can give your pet a gift that would last a lifetime for less.

When you look at the shelter populations of unwanted pets, you must know that it is too expensive NOT to neuter.

12. Please do the right thing.

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